Chemical Storage

MSDSs, Storage, Handling, Transport, Labeling, computer management systems, and anything else to do with safety.
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matc
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Joined: 17 Feb 2023, 08:13
Job Title: Science Lab Technician
School: MidCoast Christian College
State/Location: NSW

Chemical Storage

Post by matc »

HI Everyone,

I am currently trying to organise the Chem Store, the previous lab tech just had them in alphabetical order so im trying to be a little safer.
I was reading through Science Lab & Prep area safety guidance recourse (American resource) https://www.flinnsci.com/api/library/Do ... c1ddd57a27
Page 31-34 has a chemical storage pattern guide which is pretty helpful.

But my question is, does anyone know of a comprehensive list that will tell me where chemicals like cyclohexene will fall on this list (as in organic, inorganic, Nitrate, sulfate etc) without having to google every single chemical that doesnt relate to one of the key words they have listed?

Thanks
Mat
bigmack
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by bigmack »

Science Supply Australia and Modern Teaching aids used to have all that info in their printed Catalogs if you have one. It has the dangerous Goods codes.

Heres a list I found on the internet .
DG list.pdf
So Cyclohexane is Class 3 or Flammable liquid ....it would go in your Flammable Liquid Cupboard .

However, you ideally should have an SDS for every Chemical you have anyway to be WHS Compliant . Each SDS will contain everthing you need to know about starage and handling .

You also should have a Hazardous Chemical Register that lists every Chemical you have , How much , where it's stored , its Dangerous Goods Class .
If you haven't got one of these registers you need to get onto it quick since it is Mandatory WHS requirement . IIff'n you have one of these already , then it should by law include the DG Class which should be aguide as to where in your Chemical storeroom you are to segregate it to .
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Last edited by bigmack on 22 Mar 2024, 14:18, edited 1 time in total.
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Anna Z
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Joined: 16 Feb 2021, 14:39
Job Title: Lab Manager
School: DET Secondary School
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by Anna Z »

wow... just checked out the Flinn science thing you posted... full on.

Basically we have ours in their DG cabinets and segregated where needed. All the rest that are class 9 or no class are done alphabetical. Powders and dry chemicals on higher shelves, all liquids down lower and in bunding incase of leakage. There are a couple of strange class 9's that need specific storage but we just placed them somewhere that made sense (i.e. next to things that are relatively inert).
matc
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Joined: 17 Feb 2023, 08:13
Job Title: Science Lab Technician
School: MidCoast Christian College
State/Location: NSW

Re: Chemical Storage

Post by matc »

bigmack wrote: 22 Mar 2024, 12:51 Science Supply Australia and Modern Teaching aids used to have all that info in their printed Catalogs if you have one. It has the dangerous Goods codes.

Heres a list I found on the internet .
DG list.pdf

Howeever, you ideally should have an SDS for every Chemical you have anyway to be WHS Compliant . Each SDS will contain everthing you need to know about starage and handling .
Hi Bigmack,

Thankyou for that info, I do have an old SSA book which is helpful, but its not exactly what im looking for, and judging by Annas response, maybe its over the top anyway lol Did you look at the link I posted? It has all different shelves for instance the top shelf will hold inorganic sulfur, phosphorus, arsenic etc. the next shelf down will hold inorganic Halides, sulfates, sulfites etc. So it gives a lot of examples but things like cyclohexene arent obvious where they belong. So i was trying to find something that says this chemical belongs with the arsenates and cyanides, or the borates and chromates etc without spending the next month going through each one reading sds etc
matc
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by matc »

Anna Z wrote: 22 Mar 2024, 13:25 wow... just checked out the Flinn science thing you posted... full on.

Basically we have ours in their DG cabinets and segregated where needed. All the rest that are class 9 or no class are done alphabetical. Powders and dry chemicals on higher shelves, all liquids down lower and in bunding incase of leakage. There are a couple of strange class 9's that need specific storage but we just placed them somewhere that made sense (i.e. next to things that are relatively inert).
HI Anna, So it sounds like this might be a little extreme? lol Maybe ill just stick with what you do then :D
bigmack
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by bigmack »

Mat , sorry I was just editing my post above . But in my opinion , that article is very comprehensive but totaly over the Top .
The ADG class ( Australian Dangerous Goods) class should give you enough info to deal with storage .
DG storage cabnets are expensive . Start off with a Flammable liquids one first . That is where you'll stick you Cyclohexane BTW .....it's Class 3.

Next important is an Oxidizer Cabinet for all those Nitrates etc that are Class 5.1

Then you might get a Corrosives cabinet for those class 8 Acids . and perhaps another one for the Corrosive Class 8 Bases

If your school is totally cashed up ( which most aren't nower days) , then get a Flamable solids cabinet and finally a Poisons one .
You can go totally stupid on staorage if you want , but in most cases its over the top for a school.
Merilyn1
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by Merilyn1 »

Segregate according the dangerous goods code is the simplest. Although DGC now only apply to transport, there is no issue with using this system for storage as it clearly states what can and can't be stored together eg oxidisers are to be stored a long way from flammables.
Happy for you to PM me and I can give you some more help.
matc
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by matc »

Thanks bigmack and Merilyn1 for your reply. I will do as you have suggested.

Thanks
Mat
bigmack
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by bigmack »

Merilyn1 wrote: 26 Mar 2024, 06:39 ….. eg oxidisers are to be stored a long way from flammables.

I remember seeing that when I first read the WHS recommendations on that Merilyn .
They said IIRC , a distance no closer that 5 Meters but seeing as my Chem store was barely 3 meters long , I realised you just have to do the best with what you have .
Merilyn1
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by Merilyn1 »

Five metres? Yeah, good luck with that in most school prep rooms/chem stores!
You're right, you work with what you have. Also good to remember, in the grand scheme of things, we are working with small quantities.
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JudyM
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by JudyM »

I have a large corrosives cabinet with acids on one side and alkalis on the other. A flammable liquids liquids cabinet and a separate flammable solids cabinet. Poisons are in a separate cupboard in alphabetical order.
Oxidisers are grouped together in alphabetical order on a shelf at least 1m away from everything else.
Other than that, I have sulfates in alphabetical order and the same with carbonates and other salts.
The local fire brigade came to do an inspection not too long ago and they were very impressed. Thank goodness!
matc
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by matc »

Thank you everyone
mtg
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by mtg »

My register/stocktaking document is off the Vic ed dept site. It is in alphabetical order, it tells you chemical/substance, room for amount, container size, strength, hazardous substance, dangerous goods, dangerous goods class with description, sub catergory and packaging group. eg Acetic acid glacial-(amount)- 3L-90%-yes-yes-8-Corrosive-3-II. (all I have to do is fill in amount which I can add to or subtract).
The only downside is it has lots of chemicals on it I don't have. But it is wonderful for finding stuff, and calculating packaging group amounts in each storage section.
I'll try and find the link, it's on a different computer.
Merilyn1
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by Merilyn1 »

For NSW Schools, look on the Safework NSW website for the Code of Practice for Hazardous Chemicals. This details information that you need on a manifest and what you need on a register. For most of us, we only need a register which requires less information.
There's also some handy info on labelling requirements.
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Anna Z
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Re: Chemical Storage

Post by Anna Z »

mtg wrote: 15 Apr 2024, 15:46 My register/stocktaking document is off the Vic ed dept site. It is in alphabetical order, it tells you chemical/substance, room for amount, container size, strength, hazardous substance, dangerous goods, dangerous goods class with description, sub catergory and packaging group. eg Acetic acid glacial-(amount)- 3L-90%-yes-yes-8-Corrosive-3-II. (all I have to do is fill in amount which I can add to or subtract).
The only downside is it has lots of chemicals on it I don't have. But it is wonderful for finding stuff, and calculating packaging group amounts in each storage section.
I'll try and find the link, it's on a different computer.
delete or hide the chemicals you don't have :) will make it so much easier to navigate.
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